Tag Archives: exhibition

The Trickle-Down Syndrome

Benedict Drew [2017] The Trickle-Down Syndrome. Installation view. Whitechapel Gallery, London. Photo Sophia Kosmaoglou.
Benedict Drew [2017] The Trickle-Down Syndrome. Installation view. Whitechapel Gallery, London. Photo Sophia Kosmaoglou.
In August 2017 we visited Benedict Drew‘s exhibition The Trickle-Down Syndrome at the Whitechapel Gallery with students on the Critical Theory in Contemporary Art Practice course. The exhibition was a sprawling interconnected array of objects, banners, screens, cables and digital components. What is the Trickle-Down Syndrome? How does it relate to the infamous laissez faire economic theory? What are the throbbing fleshy forms and knobbly knotted forms represented in videos, banners and roughly-hewn objects?

We spent a couple of hours viewing and discussing the exhibition and everyone was asked to write a 250-500 word review that evening for a workshop the next morning. Each review is written in a uniquely different style and approach, with a different interpretation of the exhibition. We were all very impressed by this outcome so we decided to share the results.

CONTENTS

ALISON GILL Slush Economics and Other Symptoms
ARIELLE FRANCIS What is the point, Benedict Drew
DOROTHY HUNTER No Guts and No Glory
EMILY STAPLETON JEFFERIS Bendedict Drew: The Trickle Down System
IAN BIRKHEAD In the Synthetic Bowel
JUN ABE Undergoing the Trickle-Down Syndrome: Underneath Your Flesh
TAMMY SMITH A sensory journey through absurdly visualised bodily functions vs the state economy


ALISON GILL Slush Economics and Other Symptoms

The Trickle-Down Syndrome is a multimedia installation by Benedict Drew involving sculpture, music and video. The mesmerising and seductive impact of the work is immediate on entering the exhibition. Hand painted perspective lines cover the floor and wall fanning out in a black and white radial shape drawing viewers toward a screen showing an egg or cell dividing.

Benedict Drew [2017] The Trickle-Down Syndrome. Installation view. Whitechapel Gallery, London. Photo Alison Gill.
Benedict Drew [2017] The Trickle-Down Syndrome. Installation view. Whitechapel Gallery, London. Photo Alison Gill.
Benedict Drew [2017] The Trickle-Down Syndrome. Installation view. Whitechapel Gallery, London. Photo Ian Birkhead.
Benedict Drew [2017] The Trickle-Down Syndrome. Installation view. Whitechapel Gallery, London. Photo Ian Birkhead.
Benedict Drew [2017] The Trickle-Down Syndrome. Installation view. Whitechapel Gallery, London. Photo Dorothy Hunter.
Benedict Drew [2017] The Trickle-Down Syndrome. Installation view. Whitechapel Gallery, London. Photo Dorothy Hunter.
Benedict Drew [2017] The Trickle-Down Syndrome. Installation view. Whitechapel Gallery, London. Photo Dorothy Hunter.
Benedict Drew [2017] The Trickle-Down Syndrome. Installation view. Whitechapel Gallery, London. Photo Dorothy Hunter.
This is the beginning of the Trickle-Down Syndrome. It sounds pathological, in fact, this title refers to trickle-down economics, a theory of wealth distribution which has, according to the International Monetary Fund been proven to not exist. The poor get poorer while the rich get richer. Here it is then, represented as a ‘syndrome’, a pathological collection of symptoms. Drew’s diagnosis is simple; the trickle down has turned to slush. So how does this manifest itself as an art exhibition? There are many references to the body. Around the corner are large colourful intestinal wall hoardings cable tied to galvanised steel rails, slick and street aesthetics combined. Electronic ambient bleeps and pops provide a sonic over-lay to the whole installation. And when Drew talks about escape being a potent form of resistance, I can’t help wondering if the alter-come-stage he has created with giant eyeballs hanging onto a waxy brain are the sci-fi signifiers to an altered reality. It’s not here though. The video murmurs on with bad news and more innards. Mirrors, repetition of eyes and cones, lots of signs of ritual and at the centre a golden gong. Around another corner ‘That Sinking Feeling’ blinks in pastel pink on a wall, down below a video monitor on a packing crate shows someone is stuck in the mud and momentarily, a muzzle of a mule appears. To the side old Lidl bags contain the speakers all shielded and contained by red welding screens. Confused? Me too, that’s the point.

The last little room uses symmetry again, a theme throughout and reference Drew says, to Busbey Berkley but could equally be the more colourful pop homages made by Michel Gondry such as Around the World (Daft Punk). Another influence sited is Max Ernst’s landscapes. I had to look hard for these: The gong perhaps as it features in ‘production image for The Trickle-Down Syndrome’? Piled up in the corner are free newspapers, Financial Times pink, blowing around. There is a grungy look to the digital photo-collaged drawings it contains. On one page there is a drawing of a mule with a thought bubble saying ‘I hate humans’. On another page there is a photo of a statue, arms in the air and branching out to red coral. Over this is drawn yellow radiating line, an aura of sorts. Is this Daphne when she transforms from human form into a tree, to return back to the earth? Is this at the heart of Drew’s desire for ‘ecstatic protest’, I wonder? We humans are better off ‘out of it’ he seems to be saying. If this is it, it is a nihilistic project indeed but he knows how to make this pill a sweet one to swallow.


ARIELLE FRANCIS What is the point, Benedict Drew

To descend into this particular piece of work, was frus-trating work. An environment difficult to enjoy, Benedict Drew does not make it an easy bodily experience.

Benedict Drew [2017] The Trickle-Down Syndrome. Installation view. Whitechapel Gallery, London. Photo Dorothy Hunter.
Benedict Drew [2017] The Trickle-Down Syndrome. Installation view. Whitechapel Gallery, London. Photo Dorothy Hunter.
Benedict Drew [2017] The Trickle-Down Syndrome. Installation view. Whitechapel Gallery, London. Photo Dorothy Hunter.
Benedict Drew [2017] The Trickle-Down Syndrome. Installation view. Whitechapel Gallery, London. Photo Dorothy Hunter.
Benedict Drew [2017] The Trickle-Down Syndrome. Installation view. Whitechapel Gallery, London. Photo Ian Birkhead.
Benedict Drew [2017] The Trickle-Down Syndrome. Installation view. Whitechapel Gallery, London. Photo Ian Birkhead.
Benedict Drew [2017] The Trickle-Down Syndrome. Installation view. Whitechapel Gallery, London. Photo Sophia Kosmaoglou.
Benedict Drew [2017] The Trickle-Down Syndrome. Installation view. Whitechapel Gallery, London. Photo Sophia Kosmaoglou.
Large illustrations that impose upon your existence – their height and sheer width are admirable. I wondered how it came into the room for unlike any painting on a wall, it cannot simply be hung at eye level. These sheets of fabric hold high from ceiling to floor, detached from the wall, softly lit from behind. This glow lightly frames the supposedly hand drawn curves, the images existing in pairs of three, a face off if you will. Competing against each other on parallels planes there is nothing to compare, for all feel the same regardless. Nothing special exists within, other than curvy curvy wormy monotonous hollowness and their obvious ability to say “here I am. I take up space. Was probably installed via machine and scaffolding. Regardless, be fascinated with me”

Moving past these large scribble sisters, towards the far back of the exhibition space, we see The Box, on a box, within a box… Framing, framed, Frames. The words “SINKING THAT FEELING”, if viewed from the right angle, perfectly frames once more these boxes, taking this entrapment from the floor to the wall, this dead-end horizon providing a canvas to the words projected. They “hug” the installation, they -strangle- incompletely.

The tangible quality of this installed work also happens to be the only piece that fully distances itself from all surrounding white walls. Instead, existing as four red fabric partitions giving the onlooker the ability to walk around the installation -as well as through it. Be daring and look at others through the red material, peak through the vast gaps of this broken cube, watch others as they watch the monitor, a man trapped within, and in, mud. Pulling one leg out drives the other leg in -exhaustion overworking self entrapment, an escape to where? A release to what? “That sinking feeling”, flashes alongside the work further reminding us of the inability to escape, how this cycle returns.

Discomfort is a word not misplaced in association to “Trickle Down Syndrome”, and perhaps these two pieces in discussion represent this concept justly. I would note however, that apart from this perhaps singular truth, Drew’s intentions are seemingly either accidentally into being or sometimes lost entirely. Inside the exhibition, I found myself more absorbed by my solipsism in that moment, attentions confused as I tried to rebalance basic comfort levels, ignoring the politics portrayed. An uneasy experience that is difficult to endure, if it were not for a moments rest and reflection away from that space, I would for sure not have this analysis. Perhaps a little too abstract an idea, I wouldn’t recommend the show, but on reflection I appreciate the fodder nonetheless.


DOROTHY HUNTER No Guts and No Glory
Benedict Drew [2017] The Trickle-Down Syndrome. Installation view. Whitechapel Gallery, London. Photo Dorothy Hunter.
Benedict Drew [2017] The Trickle-Down Syndrome. Installation view. Whitechapel Gallery, London. Photo Dorothy Hunter.
The Trickle-Down Syndrome parallels the limits of human bodies with the organisational and systemic ones that utilise them, reframing their place in their machinations at will. Organs blow up, extend out, condense down. They seem to revolt against their position of servitude to a unified whole, a body whose identity is unknown to them, means nothing to them but ongoing labour.

Benedict Drew [2017] The Trickle-Down Syndrome. Installation view. Whitechapel Gallery, London. Photo Dorothy Hunter.
Benedict Drew [2017] The Trickle-Down Syndrome. Installation view. Whitechapel Gallery, London. Photo Dorothy Hunter.
In each corner of the main gallery an organised tangle of intestinal forms geometrically snakes across enormous wall hangings, weirdly evocative of William Morris, or as if cancer worked on an organ rather than cellular level. They flank dark nondescript organic forms on the hangings in between, printed on searing orange and green. One mass, seen on the rear wall hanging, is made of various shades of love-heart pink, more blatantly organic in the shaky network of striped tendrils that radiate outwards, obviously digitally and simply distended. Despite this, each print looks misleadingly relief-like in its spots and patterns of dark texture, with foregrounds crisply clipping backgrounds in the blankets of saturated colour.

Benedict Drew [2017] The Trickle-Down Syndrome. Installation view. Whitechapel Gallery, London. Photo Dorothy Hunter.
Benedict Drew [2017] The Trickle-Down Syndrome. Installation view. Whitechapel Gallery, London. Photo Dorothy Hunter.
In contrast, the physically handmade pieces within the installation are faux-naive. On an alter-like arrangement on a wide white stage, fleshy plasticine borders are pressed around a painted mass of one-stroke ribs, cratered papier mache eyes sit on stalks metres long, or are dripping, primordial threats painted on drums. Hollow teeth-like forms are drawn on mirrors. On screens, a stuffed ream of 3d-rendered intestines slowly twirl, and hollow shapes move over the face of a female actor. This arrangement is symmetrically composed with some co-ordinating and mismatched layers of visual and sound, leaving her words and meaning indistinguishable. Technology clearly excels our ability to represent our own makeup.

Benedict Drew [2017] The Trickle-Down Syndrome. Installation view. Whitechapel Gallery, London. Photo Dorothy Hunter.
Benedict Drew [2017] The Trickle-Down Syndrome. Installation view. Whitechapel Gallery, London. Photo Dorothy Hunter.
There’s a sterile opulence, the backlit hangings lording over the space like religious icons. The trickle-down effect sees each strata of class in a cycle of aspiration to, and definition against, the other, causing a cycle of capitalist activity. The digital and handmade seem complicit in a similar cycle. The trickle-down isn’t active; the apparatus is too divided. Seeing a face, digitally rendered, sculpted, painted, only ever seems unreal. The only bodily exteriors seen revel in this. With haptic detachment from our interior, all we have are illustrations, perhaps the odd x-ray or ultrasound scan. Alienation is our normal state; feeling small in the unseen power we are passive to. There is no gore, no viscerality, only looped unknowns.

Benedict Drew [2017] The Trickle-Down Syndrome. Installation view. Whitechapel Gallery, London. Photo Dorothy Hunter.
Benedict Drew [2017] The Trickle-Down Syndrome. Installation view. Whitechapel Gallery, London. Photo Dorothy Hunter.
A man wades in mud, eventually reaches a sinking mule. Sound emanates from LIDL bags – one covertly painted with the words “DESIRE STUFF”. Such close shots make the actions hard to follow; red welding screens can be passed through or observed through – turning something a little scatological into something even more suggestive. It’s perhaps communistic, the red square exploded, overtly three dimensional in its symbol pulled back into real space.

Benedict Drew [2017] The Trickle-Down Syndrome. Installation view. Whitechapel Gallery, London. Photo Dorothy Hunter.
Benedict Drew [2017] The Trickle-Down Syndrome. Installation view. Whitechapel Gallery, London. Photo Dorothy Hunter.
It sits as a counterpoint to the yellow-gelled adjacent box room, where graphic eyes radiate from palms, taking a landscape-like slow pan across uncanny fleshy valleys on either side. It feels suggestive of a state achieved going up someone’s anus, both transcendent and comedic. Against the first space’s religious impression I’m reminded of the power constructs around abstracted ritualistic culture, a kind of hypnotic indulgence of self via bodily manipulation.

This exhibition makes my own materiality feel totally separate from my conscious self; my cellular intelligences seem to fall through. These systems don’t work if they’re closely observed, and indeed, don’t seem to invite this. I’m discomforted, hypnotised yet rejected by the work in the repellent combination of recorded, altered and synthetic space.


EMILY STAPLETON JEFFERIS Bendedict Drew: The Trickle Down System
Benedict Drew [2017] The Trickle-Down Syndrome (detail). Whitechapel Gallery, London. Photo Dorothy Hunter.
Benedict Drew [2017] The Trickle-Down Syndrome (detail). Whitechapel Gallery, London. Photo Dorothy Hunter.
Benedict Drew [2017] The Trickle-Down Syndrome. Installation view. Whitechapel Gallery, London. Photo Dorothy Hunter.
Benedict Drew [2017] The Trickle-Down Syndrome. Installation view. Whitechapel Gallery, London. Photo Dorothy Hunter.
Benedict Drew [2017] The Trickle-Down Syndrome. Installation view. Whitechapel Gallery, London. Photo Sophia Kosmaoglou.
Benedict Drew [2017] The Trickle-Down Syndrome. Installation view. Whitechapel Gallery, London. Photo Sophia Kosmaoglou.
Benedict Drew [2017] The Trickle-Down Syndrome. Installation view. Whitechapel Gallery, London. Photo Dorothy Hunter.
Benedict Drew [2017] The Trickle-Down Syndrome. Installation view. Whitechapel Gallery, London. Photo Dorothy Hunter.
Is it a beating brain? Pulsating, pumping, streaming strands of black black lines. Or wait perhaps it is an embryo: dividing, spreading, evolving, mutating. A quivering uncomfortable mass of what we may become. This relentless throb thumping into my eyes, a hypnotic act of the digital spilling out of the screen into the reality of those black black hand painted lines which spread across the walls, across the floor.

They push me on, into the main space where I am surrounded, dwarfed by the bodily. Banners of intestinal patterns hang from the walls, intestines through which shit is channelled. Shit which trickles down, not money as was promised in that 80’s economic model. These banners mirror one another, create a reflection within the space. A reflection of the reflection present already within the work. Multiple layering and repeat adding to a sense of dislocation, a double take, a feeling of being overwhelmed. And with these intestinal forms are more banners. Squiggly black twisty messes of marks on punchy colour. Red. Red within the space adding to this sense of the visceral. Building upon the bodily sections present, which are only sections. What does this imply? Are these snapshots of the body suggesting that we are in a time in which we are no longer whole? A time beyond now, a dystopian future where we simply worship the wealthy, the rich, those with the money. This stage before me hints at this. It seems to act as an altar: a gong as a centrepiece, drums and screens surrounding, again arranged in a symmetrical manner, channelling thoughts of shamanism, hypnotism, of being sucked in and powerless, now incapable of making decisions. Even incapable of understanding: a woman on the screen is speaking and yet, I can only grasp one word or two. What is she talking about? And why do marks cross across the screen? They overlap her and themselves, create even more layers within this space. They seem to act to obscure, whilst also bringing a hand-drawn aesthetic into the digital, whilst the digital wires which mass from the screens seem to bring the digital into reality. There is cross over of what is real and what is unreal and a mess, it must be an intentional mess, as a result.

This mess, this confusion, forces me on around the corner into another room. And here there is more red. The red of welding screens arranged in a square within which a video of a muddy muddy quagmire plays. Are we about to become that man struggling within the mud? Are we already that man struggling within the mud? Is that donkey’s nose a premonition of the animals we have returned to being? The man slips and slides and scrambles. It appears existence is hopeless.

Moving on to the final room, a glowing yellow room which entices me in with the yellow of hope. Although there is no hope in there. More symmetry, more mirroring, more confusion. Dismembered hands channelling energy on the screen before me, and digital eyes collaged on top projecting outwards, reaching towards me. Other screens as bearers of flesh, gooey and soft, and yet not actually flesh. I cannot really gain the message, grasp this work, make many connections, and yet I like it. Aesthetically I am drawn to the bold, hand-drawn, hand-made pieces which contrast the slick digital effects. I relish this demonstration of the overwhelming world that we now inhabit, as it comforts me that I am not the only one to find it so. And I am also intrigued by this vision of the dystopian world that we may unconsciously wander into…


IAN BIRKHEAD In the Synthetic Bowel
Benedict Drew [2017] The Trickle-Down Syndrome. Installation view. Whitechapel Gallery, London. Photo Ian Birkhead.
Benedict Drew [2017] The Trickle-Down Syndrome. Installation view. Whitechapel Gallery, London. Photo Ian Birkhead.
Benedict Drew [2017] The Trickle-Down Syndrome (detail). Whitechapel Gallery, London. Photo Dorothy Hunter.
Benedict Drew [2017] The Trickle-Down Syndrome (detail). Whitechapel Gallery, London. Photo Dorothy Hunter.
Benedict Drew [2017] The Trickle-Down Syndrome. Installation view. Whitechapel Gallery, London. Photo Ian Birkhead.
Benedict Drew [2017] The Trickle-Down Syndrome. Installation view. Whitechapel Gallery, London. Photo Ian Birkhead.
One of the firsts themes you’ll notice walking around the exhibition is the artists use of symmetry. The artist has used it in his previous work and obviously it helps with compositional balance, but I think in this case kind of suggests a cyclical nature to the journey he takes you on. For me at least it demonstrates the successful splitting of the cell at the start of the show, and also these hands that perhaps advertise products and they’re trying to hypnotise you while the video screens that are on either side of the room surround you in the synthetic bowel. Maybe after this you’ll be pooped out as a consumer crossed with a product. I also wonder if his work is in some way talking about the commodification of the self.

Benedict Drew [2017] The Trickle-Down Syndrome. Installation view. Whitechapel Gallery, London. Photo Sophia Kosmaoglou.
Benedict Drew [2017] The Trickle-Down Syndrome. Installation view. Whitechapel Gallery, London. Photo Sophia Kosmaoglou.
The main theme that showed its self to me and what I personally found quite interesting about the show was the combination of the synthetic and organic. Or perhaps more accurately the synthetic posing as the organic. This is first described in the wall hangings which are in a material reminiscent of a shower curtain or a table cloth with organic forms painted or printed onto them. The organic forms remind me of intestines but also roots and veins in there winding, connecting disorder, these are recurrent in the work. The central stage or alter holds two eyes and a that lead to a brain and at first glance they seem very organic but that might be due to the contrast of them against the backdrop of screens and wires and other very machined looking objects. On closer inspection the eyes are made of painted tinfoil. A manufactured material masquerading as something organic. Much like the relationship between social media influencers and there audience could be perceived as a (falsely) honest connection between brands and consumers when in reality its just another avenue for advertisement and consumption. In the last room there is a film playing on two screens that shows an ambiguous, at first glance fleshy, form that appears to be made form expanding foam an-other example of the artificial posing as the organic. As a whole this is representative to me of the human morphing into there consumer products. Or maybe it becoming less clear what the distinction between the consumer and the advertiser is. As well as highlighting consumer goods being en-trenched in the contemporary human experience.

Benedict Drew [2017] The Trickle-Down Syndrome. Installation view. Whitechapel Gallery, London. Photo Ian Birkhead.
Benedict Drew [2017] The Trickle-Down Syndrome. Installation view. Whitechapel Gallery, London. Photo Ian Birkhead.
The way things come out the screens and become physical is probably a direct reference to the trickle down theory and the new norm for consumer items to be replicated and produced and consumed quicker than ever, aided by social media and celebrity endorsement. This is why towards the end of the journey we watch a man bogged down by all the crap, that instead of trickling has pretty much flooded down underneath him to the point where he can barely walk.


JUN ABE Undergoing the Trickle-Down Syndrome: Underneath Your Flesh
Benedict Drew [2017] The Trickle-Down Syndrome (detail). Whitechapel Gallery, London. Photo Dorothy Hunter.
Benedict Drew [2017] The Trickle-Down Syndrome (detail). Whitechapel Gallery, London. Photo Dorothy Hunter.
From the first work, I’m already dragged into the Drew’s art world. The first work is the pig skin-like surfaced lump with brain figured digital design collage in blue, which slightly expands and contracts with repeating heart-beat like sound. It looks my brain of having an epilepsy attack.

Benedict Drew [2017] The Trickle-Down Syndrome. Installation view. Whitechapel Gallery, London. Photo Sophia Kosmaoglou.
Benedict Drew [2017] The Trickle-Down Syndrome. Installation view. Whitechapel Gallery, London. Photo Sophia Kosmaoglou.
Then next, on the right and left wall, there are three-set brain-look photo based tapestries: red one on the right wall, and green one on the left as if they are right and left brain. Trickles of nerves literally down over the tapestries.

On the centre stage, there is a collaborative work:

Benedict Drew [2017] The Trickle-Down Syndrome. Installation view. Whitechapel Gallery, London. Photo Ian Birkhead.
Benedict Drew [2017] The Trickle-Down Syndrome. Installation view. Whitechapel Gallery, London. Photo Ian Birkhead.
Eye catching one is head-from-the-eye balls object surrounded by panels of road corns-ish figures. On each sides of the object, there are TV screens on which a woman is repeating unclear words with clacking noise of stones, and sometimes just a wasted land is projected. Black cables trickle down all over the floor.

Everything is scattered, noisy, occupied: there is no empty place. It is like our daily world where there are too much information and noise, never sleep, never stop.

On the left corner, the pile of newspapers is flowing nostalgically.

At the end, old-fashioned TV is, as if, left on the wooden box. On the screen, a man is stuck in the mud. The contrast of black and white TV screen and four red partitions around it don’t look vivid, rather the work seems to represent autism: shutting down oneself from the loud society and being stuck in black muddy inner silent world.

The works constitute what he calls submersion in social and environmental despair.

Though there is no real photo or video of human body, you can still “feel” it. You may feel as if your brain, body and mind are scanned, examined and exposed. At least I felt so.


TAMMY SMITH A sensory journey through absurdly visualised bodily functions vs the state economy
Benedict Drew [2017] The Trickle-Down Syndrome. Installation view. Whitechapel Gallery, London. Photo Dorothy Hunter.
Benedict Drew [2017] The Trickle-Down Syndrome. Installation view. Whitechapel Gallery, London. Photo Dorothy Hunter.
I’m divided by what I’ve seen to how I feel. Upon entering Benedict Drew’s The Trickle-Down Syndrome exhibition at the Whitechapel Gallery you’re greeted by a variety of visuals and sound. Drew uses a variety of materials, from animation, video, 2D

Benedict Drew [2017] The Trickle-Down Syndrome. Installation view. Whitechapel Gallery, London. Photo Dorothy Hunter.
Benedict Drew [2017] The Trickle-Down Syndrome. Installation view. Whitechapel Gallery, London. Photo Dorothy Hunter.
images, sculpture, installation and mixes both old and new technology. There’s a play with scale and his inspirations range from 1930’s stage sets to surrealist landscapes. He also references the human body and there are suggestions that it’s bodily functions that are hinted to rather than references to money or some material wealth.

Benedict Drew [2017] The Trickle-Down Syndrome. Installation view. Whitechapel Gallery, London. Photo Dorothy Hunter.
Benedict Drew [2017] The Trickle-Down Syndrome. Installation view. Whitechapel Gallery, London. Photo Dorothy Hunter.
Benedict Drew [2017] The Trickle-Down Syndrome. Installation view. Whitechapel Gallery, London. Photo Dorothy Hunter.
Benedict Drew [2017] The Trickle-Down Syndrome. Installation view. Whitechapel Gallery, London. Photo Dorothy Hunter.
The message seems to border on the absurd and there’s this play between crude and refined. Did he run out of materials or budget when making some of his installations? Or is he making a bigger point? Likewise, having the cables and technology that enables him to visualise his films, does that somehow enhance his meanings? The absurd is also visualised with Drew’s powerful use of bright neon colours, clashes of random shapes and bizarre sounds such as the noise two pebbles make against each other.

Is it still classed as art if I don’t value or identify with it? Can I respect it even if I do not like it and find the ‘emotional sensory journey’ uncomfortable? Would I like this exhibition more if it wasn’t so in your face? Is it performance art if it’s about the viewer’s journey around the 1 artwork scattered throughout the one direction curated room? The experience of the journey is just as important? So the concept is stronger than the actual art? Would changing the way it’s curated change are feelings to the work?

The merits would be that it’s bold as his subject matter is niche and he’s clearly passionate about his work, it’s not necessarily going to be to everyone’s taste. How he chooses to exhibition his final pieces is intriguing, if indeed he gets much say.

In summary, it’s big, brash and bold, it’s an insight into the artist as much as it’s about the work. The journey you take is certainly an experience and it’s vagueness is cleverly left up to you to judge whether it’s brave or annoying. Is the concept better than the outcome? Do I appreciate what I’ve seen? Is this art?

I would argue that it’s not sophisticated, it lacks the multi layers of depth and meaning and is so niche that it’s like Marmite, you’re either going to love it or hate it. Which in one way it great to get such extremely responses out from his audience, but for me it just falls short, it doesn’t push the boundaries, it doesn’t use shock tactics and it doesn’t connect.

The fact that it makes me the viewer question this means that on some level maybe it deserves a little more of my respect and like Marmite only you can decide by taking the journey with the artist yourself.


Exhibition-Making

Exhibition-making_banner

Course Outline | Course Dates | Tutor | Bibliography | Resources
Course Description

Prepare to be guided by your tutor through the practical and logistical processes involved in staging an exhibition on this one-day course. The course starts with the initial concept and research, moving to agreements and layout and finally, to the hanging of artworks. We will also advise you on insurance, public liability and health and safety requirements in public spaces. As well as developing your knowledge of innovative exhibition design, it’s a chance to exchange ideas with the rest of the group. Students are welcome to bring along ideas in relation to future exhibitions that they would like to or will be organising.

Course Outcomes

You will be capable of organising an exhibition from start to finish, as well as appreciating a successful exhibition design layout. You’ll be aware of the procedures between galleries and artists.

Who Should Attend

Artists, craftspeople or anyone eager to learn about the practical side of organising an exhibition.

For more information on the course, including the schedule, lectures and reading please download the Course Outline.

Upcoming Course Dates

No upcoming course dates.

Tutor

Sophia Kosmaoglou is an artist, tutor, curator and founder of [ART&CRITIQUE], an alternative art education network based in London. Her current practice blurs the boundaries between art, activism and education to question the ontology of art and its social and institutional functions. She has a practice-based PhD in Fine Art from Goldsmiths and her research interests include institutional critique and the relationship between art and politics, institutions and independent organisations and collective practices. She has previously taught Critical Studies and Studio Practice on BA Fine Art Practice and Joint Honours courses at Goldsmiths and is currently a Visiting Tutor at Chelsea College of Arts. For more information please see https://videomole.tv

ART CRAWL

Occasionally on the last Saturday of the month when we head out to visit exhibitions and have a critical discussion on route. Anyone can volunteer to curate the crawl, if you’re interested please download the infosheet for more information.

Mayfair to Fitzrovia: Joy, Dance, Magic – Three Artist Films

Saturday, 30 March 2019, 13:45 – 17:00
Meet 13:45 at Lévy Gorvy, 22 Old Bond St, Mayfair, London W1S 4PY
Curated by Eva Ruschkowski
Free, booking via Eventbrite

artcrawl#14Join us for a stroll from Mayfair to Fitzrovia to visit three galleries showing video works by Agnes Martin, Geta Brătescu and Rachel Rose. The Art & Critique Art Crawls are excursions that offer the opportunity to explore, articulate thoughts and critically discuss exhibitions in a group.

We will meet at 13:45 at Lévy Gorvy Gallery to begin our journey with Martin’s film ‘Gabriel’ (1976). We follow a fourteen-year-old boy, the protagonist of the film, on his leisurely meander through a rural landscape to take part in his innocent exploration of natural beauty. “[The movie] turned out to be about joy – the same thing my paintings are about” the artist states. By contrasting Martin’s film with her serene geometric experimentation on canvas which she mainly is known for, Lévy Gorvy allow a deeper insight into the artist’s work and, as the gallery proposes, to “linger in the pensive calm that Martin’s art, regardless of its medium, so exquisitely conveys.”

A similar juxtaposition of still and moving images will greet us at Hauser and Wirth, our second stop, which is showing a group of works Geta Brătescu made over the last decade. Richly informed by literature and mythology, Brătescu untiringly explores her fascination for drawing, composition and line. ‘When I draw, I can say that my hand dances’. Hauser and Wirth put her drawings and collages in conversation with two films ‘Linia (The Line)’ (2014) and ‘The Gesture, The Drawing’ (2018), which were created in collaboration with Ștefan Sava and give an intimate insight into Brătescu’s studio practice and creative thinking process.

We will round out our walk at Pilar Corrias with Rachel Rose’s atmospheric film set in 1500s rural England. ‘Wil-o-Wisp’ (2018) tells the story of Elspeth Blake, which was inspired by the fate of healers who practised in the time of the Enclosure Movement. Rose draws us in the realm of magic at the same time examining the drastic historical shift and its consequences caused by the privatisation of communal land.

SCHEDULE
13.45 FOCUS: Agnes Martin Lévy Gorvy, 22 Old Bond St, Mayfair, London W1S 4PY
15.00 Geta Brătescu Hauser & Wirth, 23 Savile Row, Mayfair, London W1S 2ET
16.00 Rachel Rose: Wil-o-Wisp Pilar Corrias, 54 Eastcastle St, Fitzrovia, London W1W 8EF

#15 Deptford Art & Gentrification Walk Pt. 2

Saturday, 29 September 2018, 13:00 -18:00
Meet at 1pm inside Deptford Railway Station, Deptford High Street, London SE8 3NU
Curated by Sophia Kosmaoglou and Paul Clayton
All welcome, booking available but not required

[ARTCRAWL]#15 DeptfordHot on the heels of the Deptford Art & Gentrification Walk in May 2018 we will revisit the people, places, problems, questions and expand on the outcomes of that sweltering day.

Join us for an afternoon of discussions and encounters on the relationship between art and the process of gentrification that is currently sweeping through Deptford. We will visit community spaces, galleries, studios and landmarks on a walk along the streets, waterways, green spaces and new developments. We will meet local residents, artists, curators and activists to hear about their experiences and how they are resisting or overcoming the displacement of communities and the shrinking of public and creative spaces.

Do artists have a measure of responsibility in the process of gentrification and what can they do to resist the successive waves of change that inevitably lead to their own displacement? How can local residents regain some control over the rapid changes in their environment and the impact on their lives?

[ARTCRAWL]#15 Deptford MAP
Click to download the map.
We will address the controversial developments currently proposed or underway in Deptford and the responsibility artists have within the process of gentrification. How can artists resist the redevelopment of community, social, cultural and creative spaces that are crucial to their activities? How can artists evaluate the available opportunities and what alternatives are there?

Come along to share your own stories and contribute to the discussion. Meet us at 1pm inside Deptford Rail Station or join us along the way. For more information, the itinerary and a map of the route please visit the website. Maps will be available on the day in case you wonder off and want to meet us later on.

Itinerary

More details coming soon, itinerary TBC and subject to change

13:00 Deptford Train Station Deptford High Street, London SE8 3NU

The meeting point is inside Deptford Railway Station.

13:15 Deptford Market & The Albany Douglas Way, London SE8 4AG

Visit the Albany and walk through Deptford Market. If you’d like to get some lunch there are excellent choices within close proximity to the station, including summer rolls from Viet Rest, sushi from M&D Japanese Takeaway, jollof rice from Tomi’s Kitchen , bagels from the Waiting Room or fish patties and summer fruit from the Jamaican food stalls on Douglas Way.

13:30 Deptford Cinema 39 Deptford Broadway, London SE8 4PQ

We will have a chat with members of Deptford Cinema about its award-winning programme, community cinema, self-organisation and affordable housing.

14:00 Open Forum Old Tidemill Wildlife Garden Reginald Road, London SE8 4RS

We will begin with a quick tour of the garden and return to the amphitheater for a discussion on the relationship between art and the process of gentrification currently underway in Deptford. We will hear about the Save Reginald Save Tidemill  campaign and the current occupation to protect the Tidemill Garden from impending demolition and how to get involved.  We will hear from local residents, artists, curators and activists about how they experience the impact of gentrification and how they are resisting displacement and the shrinking of public and creative spaces. Come along to share your own perspective on the changes that are currently sweeping through Deptford. We will end the visit with some time to explore the garden and the exhibition Deptford Aint Avvinit.

15:30 1 Creekside / Goldsmiths MFA Studios, Church Street, London SE8 4RZ

We will visit the site at 1 Creekside and then double back to Goldsmiths MFA Studios to view Sue Lawes‘ work and have a chat with the artist about the proposed development at 1 Creekside.

16:00 Art Hub Gallery & Studios 5-9 Creekside, London SE8 4SA

We will view the exhibition On Time: Deptford X (PT II)  and have a chat with artist Joan Molloy. Then go on a tour of Art Hub Studios with Adrian Morris-Thomas.

16:30 Paynes Wharf / House of Phoenix

Heading north towards the river we will view remains of the Royal Dockyard, passing by the church of St. Nicholas, the site of the former Deptford Power Station, Paynes Wharf, Master Shipwright’s Palace and Twinkle Park.

17:00 Gossamer Fog 186a Deptford High Street, London SE8 3PR

Visit the exhibition The Metallurgical Ouroboros and have a chat with director and artist Samuel Capps.

17:30 Mr. Steven PippinOlivia Guigue 158 Deptford High Street, London SE8 3PQ

This is a double studio visit in the former E. Barclay FSMC FACLP Optician on the high street. Mr. Pippin will present one of his major works titled Ω= 1, a machine that makes a pencil stand perfectly still on its tip. Olivia Guigue will introduce us to her project Tamesiology. A study of the geology of the Thames’ foreshore where, among native elements, synthetic and imported materials are becoming part of the ground. A collection of «Pseudo-Minerals» gathers plastic samples selected upon aesthetic criteria for their mimicry to minerals and rocks, while «Analogies» matches natural and man-made materials for their casual resemblance. These mimesis bring us to question the dichotomy natural/artificial by observing the dynamic of anthropic materials in nature, approaching the topic of environment from a different point of view: the one of matter.

18:00 Dog & Bell 116 Prince St, London SE8 3JD

This event is also part of Deptford X (21-30 September 2018)
and Deptford Aint Avvinit (29-30 September 2018)

In the first walk we held in May 2018, we kicked-off the discussion with an open forum in the Old Tidemill Wildlife Garden about its history, its impending demolition and the campaign to save it. We discussed the measure of responsibility that artists have in the process of gentrification and what alternatives there are to partnering with developers in pursuit of affordable space. To listen to a recording of the discussion and/or read a summary of the discussion please follow this link.

The Old Tidemill Garden was Deptford’s best kept secret, a wildlife oasis with more than 70 mature trees in the middle of Deptford, where the level of air pollution is six times higher than the limit recommended by the WHO. By handing the garden to property guardians, Lewisham Council withheld this public resource from the community. But now the secret it out! The Save Reginald Save Tidemill campaign is trying to raise awareness of the garden’s existence and encourage its use by members of the community in an effort to save it from demolition.

Contribution from Donal Ruane

The article No Man’s land by Eula Biss is a fascinating non-linear essay exploring the issue of gentrification in America. I offer it here as one possible way of looking at the thorny subject of gentrification. In the essay, Biss attempts to make sense of gentrification and our collective fear of those who are unlike us, in this case it is the predominantly poor blacks that tend to inhabit the inner city neighbourhoods that have been gentrified in America. If we substitute the working classes for blacks in the American model we could pretty much use this essay to look at gentrification in London (in the UK it is less about race exclusively and more about class in general).

In addition to Bliss’s own experiences with gentrification, she explores the concept in a more academic way—using research about violent crimes, fear, and race—but she begins with Little House on the Prairie. Yes, in an essay about gentrification, she begins with pioneers.  She writes of Laura Ingalls Wilder’s childhood on the frontier, and of her own fascination with the book as a child. Then she writes:

The word pioneer betrays a disturbing willingness to repeat the worst mistake of the pioneers of the American West—the mistake of considering an inhabited place uninhabited. To imagine oneself as a pioneer in a place as densely populated, as Chicago is either to deny the existence of your neighbours or to cast them as natives who must be displaced. Either way, it is a hostile fantasy … this is our inheritance, those of us who imagine ourselves as pioneers.

In the original event Sophia organised in Deptford, which is now available online I used a similar analogy of the myth of the American West as a useful prism through which the process of gentrification could be viewed. While my model tends to concentrate more on the different stages of the colonization and commodification of working class neighbourhoods by developers … using the wild west analogy it starts with the mountain men, who are followed by the cattle barons, the pioneers, the railroads, the banks and developers etc. (Serge Leone’s Marxist western Once Upon a Time in the West is worth looking at to understand this idea). Biss is more concerned with how the pioneers view, interact with and eventually displace the indigenous population before they too are displaced. I hope this is food for thought.

Donal Ruane, 28 September 2018.

#14 Deptford Art & Gentrification Walk

Saturday, 26 May 2018, 12:00 -19:00
Meet 12pm at Deptford Railway Station, Deptford High Street, London SE8 3NU
Curated by Sophia Kosmaoglou with many thanks to Paul Clayton for his assistance
All welcome, booking not required

[ARTCRAWL]#14 DeptfordIn May we’re visiting Deptford for a day of discussions on art and gentrification. Join us for a tour of galleries, studios, community spaces and landmarks on a walk along the streets, waterways, green spaces and new developments. We will meet artists, curators and activists to explore how they are resisting or overcoming the displacement of communities and the shrinking of public and creative spaces.

[ARTCRAWL]#14-Deptford-map
Click to download the map.
Come along and share your experiences, meet us at 12noon inside Deptford Rail Station or join us along the way. Please scroll down for the itinerary and a map of the route. Maps will be available on the day in case you wonder off and want to meet us later on.

I came to London, I was very lucky, at a time when you could still squat in central London and survive here and have enough space to have a studio to work. But now, young artists coming to London – where would they even start? The rents are unbelievable. It’s frightening. (Grayson Perry)

Gentrification concerns artists because their living and work spaces as well as their exhibition, event and social spaces are under threat  by redevelopment and rising property prices. Artists are constantly on the move as they become displaced from one up-and-coming area to the next. But they also bear the brunt of criticism, as harbingers of gentrification. In his 2013 BBC Reith Lectures artist Grayson Perry announced that artists are the “shock troops of gentrification”. On closer inspection however, this claim holds little water. A recent study shows that “arts industries generally do not play a significant role in gentrification and displacement” because art organisations tend to gravitate towards areas with pre-existing creative industries in already gentrified areas.

The Marxist geographer Neil Smith argues that gentrification is a calculated strategy in capital’s search for investment opportunities on the “frontier” between expensive neighbourhoods and the “disinvested slums… where opportunity is higher”. Developers take the long view, waiting for the right conditions to exploit the “rent gap”, or the difference between the current value of a property and its potential value through redevelopment. Gentrification takes place when the rent gap can yield maximum profit. Although Smith cites examples of artists being used as “vehicles” or “fronts” for gentrification and displacement, especially in Manhattan where “gentrification and art came hand in hand”, he argues that ultimately it is capital and not culture that drives the process.

In February 2018, Rózsa Farkas, founding director of Arcadia Missa announced that she is moving her gallery from Peckham to Soho in an act of resistance against the gentrification of the area where she grew up, adding “I’d like to encourage everyone to resist”.  Short of moving away, how can artists resist the redevelopment of community, social, cultural and creative spaces that are crucial to their activities? Considering the involvement of artists and art spaces with processes of gentrification, how can artists navigate the terrain of available opportunities and what alternatives are there?

Itinerary
12:00 Deptford Train Station Deptford High Street, London SE8 3NU

The meeting point is inside Deptford Rail Station. Bring a packed lunch for a picnic at the Old Tidemill Garden or get your lunch from the high street. There are excellent choices within close proximity to the station, including vegan curry from Hullabaloo, summer rolls from Viet Rest, sushi from M&D Japanese Takeaway, jollof rice from Tomi’s Kitchen , bagels from the Waiting Room or fish patties and summer fruit from the Jamaican food stalls on Douglas Way.

12:15 Deptford Market & The Albany Douglas Way, London SE8 4AG

Visit the Albany and Deptford Market on our way to the Old Tidemill Garden for a picnic lunch.

13:00 Old Tidemill Wildlife Garden Reginald Road, London SE8 4RS

Meet and talk with artists, activists and local residents about the  campaign to rescue the Tidemill Garden from impending demolition, including artist Jacqueline Utley from the Save Achilles Area campaign, an artist from Crosswhatfields and Eponine and Nico who will tells us more about the garden and how to get involved.

13:30 Undercurrents Gallery Birds Nest, 32 Deptford Church Street, London SE8 4RZ

View the current exhibition and talk with artist and curator Karen Barnes who will take a group photo of us with Box on Wheels.

14:00 Art in Perpetuity Trust Harold Wharf, 6 Creekside, London SE8 4SA

View the exhibition m2(at)15 celebrating 15 years of m2 Gallery and talk with Ken Taylor and Ken Wilder. Join a tour of APT painting and sculpture studios with director Liz May and member artists.

15:30 Minesweeper Collective Ha’penny Hatch, Deptford Creek

Meet Camden McDonald to talk about the Minesweeper Collective, its history and future after the demise of the Minesweeper which hosted local art and community events for 14 years, and hear about new developments along the Creek.

16:30 St. Nicholas / Paynes Wharf

Heading north towards the river we will visit the site of the Royal Dockyard, passing by the church of St. Nicholas, Paynes’ Wharf, Master Shipwright’s Place and the Dog & Bell.

17:00 Enclave, 50 Resolution Way, Deptford SE8 4AL (for GPS use SE8 4NT)
18:00 Deptford Cinema 39 Deptford Broadway, London SE8 4PQ

Talk to members about community cinema, the award-winning programme, self-organisation and affordable housing. The tour coincides with Ken Russell Day screening Gothic (1986) and Altered States (1980) with speakers Stephen Volk and Dr Matt Melia, from 1pm-10pm.

18:30 Deptford X 9 Brookmill Road, London SE8 4HL

Visit Deptford X’s new headquarters and speak to Lucy Cowling about the grass-roots visual arts festival that takes place in public spaces throughout Deptford every year

19:00 Birds Nest 32 Deptford Church Street, London SE8 4RZ

We will end the tour by returning to the Bird’s Nest to see our group photo that Karen Barnes took with her mobile camera obscura early on in the afternoon.

#13 Marylebone to South Kensington

Saturday, 30 September 2017, 13:45-17:00
Meet 13:45 at Lisson Gallery 27 Bell Street London NW15BY
Curated by Anca Baciu and Mandy Wong  

All welcome, booking not required

[ARTCRAWL] #13. Flyer by Many Wong.
[ARTCRAWL] #13. Flyer by Many Wong.
In September we’re meeting at Lisson Gallery to see an exhibition by Allora & Calzadilla and then walking through the park to the Serpentine Gallery to view an exhibition by Wade Guyton, ending the crawl with the LGBTQ Tour to explore gender and sexual identities in the Victoria & Albert Museum collection. Free, everyone welcome. No need to book, just join us at 2pm or along the way. Please see below for the itinerary and a map of the route.

ITINERARY MAP
13:45 Allora & Calzadilla: Foreign in a Domestic Sense Lisson Gallery 27 Bell Street London NW15BY
15:00 Wade Guyton: Das New Yorker Atelier, Abridged Serpentine Gallery Kensington Gardens London W2 3XA
16:00 LGBTQ Tour Victoria & Albert Museum Cromwell Road London SW72RL (meet at Grand Entrance)

#12 Visit to TOMA in Southend-on-Sea

23 July 2017, 12:20-18:00
Meet 12:20pm at Southend Central Station, Southend-on-Sea SS1 1AB
Curated by Emma Edmondson

All welcome, please book your place

The Other MA (TOMA)

In July we’ve been invited on an excursion to visit The Other MA (TOMA), a 12-month alternative art education model based at Metal Art School in Southend-on-Sea. Join us for a walking tour across the cultural landscape of Southend-on-Sea with the expert guidance of Emma Edmondson, founder and coordinator of TOMA. We will visit Focal Point Gallery and The Old Waterworks, Metal Culture – home of Metal Art School and TOMA – culminating the tour at TOMA artists’ studios. 

The suggested travel route to Southend Central is via the C2C line from London Fenchurch Street, Limehouse, West Ham or Barking. A C2C train service departs from Fenchurch Street at 11:04am and arrives 12:18pm at Southend Central. Please purchase your ticket to Southend Central as we will be hopping on and off the train all day. The ticket will allow you to do this.

NB. We will be doing much walking in between destinations! Please get in touch if you have access concerns.

ITINERARY MAP
12:20 Meet at Southend Central Station, Southend-on-Sea SS1 1AB
12:30 Have lunch in the Railway pub  (best vegan food in town)
13:30 Head to Focal Point Gallery to see Maximum Overdrive
15:00 Catch the train to Westcliff-on-Sea station, half hour walk and head to The Old Waterworks for Alison Loyd’s show
16:00 Catch the train from Westcliff station to Chalkwell Park to see the home of TOMA and Metal, Chalkwell Avenue, Southend on Sea SS0 8NB
17:00 Walk to TOMA artist Richard Baxter’s pottery studio (TBC)
18:00 Grab a drink in the multitude of pubs on the seafront and take in the Estuary views!

#11 Hampstead to Finsbury Park (via Mayfair)

Saturday, 24 June 2017, 14:00 -17:00
Starts 2pm at Freud Museum 20 Maresfield Gardens, Hampstead London NW3 5SX
Curated by Sophia Kosmaoglou
Free, booking not required

[ARTCRAWL] #11In June we’re venturing on an ambitious tour of London and taking public transport to see exhibitions at the Freud Museum and Furtherfield – venues that are off the beaten path. On the way we will stop at Thomas Dane in Mayfair. Below is a map of the route and a schedule with links to further information on the exhibitions. We will take the Jubilee line from the Freud Museum to Thomas Dane, and the Victoria line from there to Finsbury Park.

Please note that entry to the Freud Museum is £8 for adults, free for children under 12, £6 for senior citizens, £4 for students, unemployed, National Trust Members & National Art Pass Members. More details here.

SCHEDULE MAP
14:00 The Best Possible School: Anna Freud, Dorothy Tiffany Burlingham & the Hietzing School in 1920s Vienna. Freud Museum 20 Maresfield Gardens, Hampstead London NW3 5SX
15:15 Paul Pfeiffer. Thomas Dane 11 Duke Street, St James’s London SW1Y 6BN
16:15 NEW WORLD ORDER. Furtherfield Gallery McKenzie Pavilion, Finsbury Park London N4 2NQ

#10 Mayfair to Fitzrovia

Saturday, 28 January 2017, 14:00 -17:00
Curated by Cristina Sousa Martínez
Free, booking not required

[ARTCRAWL]#10web

On Saturday 28 January we’re meeting 2pm at Sophia Contemporary to see the exhibition Recipe for a Poem by Azadeh Razaghdoost. Then we will head to Hamilton’s Cafe to listen to Transitivity of Implication by Daniel Toca at the Museum of Portable Sound, please bring your headphones! We will wrap up with a visit to Carroll / Fletcher for the group exhibition United We Stand. Below is the schedule with links to exhibition details and a map of the route.

SCHEDULE MAP
14:00 Azadeh Razaghdoost Sophia Contemporary, 11 Grosvenor St, London W1K 4QB
15:00 Daniel Toca, Museum of Portable Sound Hamilton’s Café, 49 Maddox St, London W1S 2PQ
16:00 United We Stand Carroll / Fletcher, 56-57 Eastcastle St, London W1W 8EQ

#9 Hampstead to Camden Town (via Chalk farm)

Saturday 26 November 2016, 14:00 – 17:00
Curated by Katy Green
Free, booking not required

[ARTCRAWL] #9web

On Saturday, 26 November we’re meeting 2pm at Camden Arts Centre to see and exhibition of Bonnie Camplin‘s work. Then we will head to Zabludowicz Collection for the exhibition Basement Odyssey by Willem Weisman. Our final stop will be the group show Streams of Warm Impermanence with artists who work with Networked-Flesh at David Roberts Art Foundation. Please see below for the schedule and a map of the route.

SCHEDULE MAP
14:00 Bonnie Camplin Camden Arts Centre, Arkwright Road, London NW3 6DG
15:00 Willem Weisman Zabludowicz Collection, 176 Prince of Wales, Road London NW5 3PT
16:00 Streams of Warm Impermanence DRAF, Symes Mews, London NW1 7JE

#8 Camberwell to Peckham

Saturday 29 October 2016, 14:00-17:00
Free, booking not required

[GALLERYCRAWL] #8

On Saturday 29 October we’re heading south and meeting 2pm at the South London Gallery to see The Source of Art is in the Life of a People by Roman Ondak, followed by a stop at Arcadia Missa to see Amalia Ulman’s solo Labour Dance, ending at South Kiosk to see And the Earth Screamed, Alive, a multi screen 16mm installation by Emma Charles. Please see below for the schedule with links to exhibition details and a map of the route. Everyone welcome.

SCHEDULE MAP
14:00
Roman Ondak South London Gallery 65-67 Peckham Road London SE5 8UH
15:15 Amalia Ulman Arcadia Missa Unit 6 Bellenden Road Business Centre London SE15 4RF
16:15 Emma Charles  South Kiosk Unit B1.1 Bussey Building 133 Rye Lane SE15 3SN

#7 Mayfair to St James (via Soho)

Saturday 24 September 2016, 14:00-17:00
Free, booking not required

[GALLERYCRAWL] #7web

On Saturday 24 September we’re meeting at Timothy Taylor to see Shez Dawood’s solo, followed by Mike Kelley’s 1999 installation Framed and Frame at Hauser & Wirth and Uri Aran’s controversial show at Sadie Coles, ending with the Jannis Kounellis retrospective at White Cube. We’re spoiled for choice this month so we’ve crammed four exhibitions into this one. See below for the schedule with links to exhibition details and a map of the route.

SCHEDULE MAP
14:00
Shezad Dawood: Kalimpong Timothy Taylor 15 Carlos Place London W1K 2EX
14:45 Mike Kelley: Framed and Frame Hauser & Wirth 23 Savile Row London W1S 2ET
15:30 Uri Aran: Two Things About Suffering Sadie Coles 62 Kingly Street London W1B 5QN
16:15 Jannis Kounellis White Cube 25 – 26 Mason’s Yard London SW1Y 6BU

#6 Mayfair to Fitzrovia

Saturday 30 July 2016, 14:00-17:00
Free, booking not required

[GALLERYCRAWL] #6

On Saturday 30 July we’re meeting at at Simon Lee Gallery to see the work of Bas Jan Ader who disappeared at sea in 1975. We will then head north to see the work of Felix Gonzalez-Torres curated by Julie Ault and Roni Horn at Hauser & Wirth. Our final stop will be at Carroll/Fletcher to see Abuse Standards Violations by Eva and Franco Mattes. Please see below for the schedule with links to exhibition details and a map of the route.

SCHEDULE MAP
14:00
Bas Jan Ader Simon Lee Gallery 12 Berkeley Street London W1J 8DT
15:00 Felix Gonzalez-Torres Hauser & Wirth 23 Savile Row London W1S 2ET
16:15 Eva and Franco Mattes Carroll/Fletcher 56-57 Eastcastle St London W1W 8EQ

#5 Hackney to Shoreditch

Saturday 25 June 2016, 14:00-17:00
Curated by Dasha Loyko
Free, booking not required

[GALLERYCRAWL] #5 webflyer

On Saturday 25 June we will meet at The Residence Gallery to see Info Pura, a group exhibition on knowledge, information and experience. Next we will visit Salon des Refuses at SPACE to see the work of Dasha Loyko and other artists rejected from the Royal Academy summer exhibition. Last stop is Blood For Light by Nastivicious at Waterside Contemporary. Please see below for the schedule with links to exhibition details and a map of the route.

SCHEDULE MAP
14:00 
Info Pura Residence Gallery 229 Victoria Park Road London E9 7HD
15:00 Salon des Refuses SPACE 129-131 Mare Street London E8 3RH
16:15 Nastivicious Blood For Light Waterside Contemporary 2 Clunbury St N1 6TT

#4 Hackney to Shoreditch

Saturday 4 June 2016, 14:00-17:00
Curated by Penelope Kupfer
Free, booking not required

[GALLERYTOUR] #4 webflyer

On Saturday 4 June we will meet at Cambridge Heath Station and set off for Vilma Gold to see the work of Oliver Stone and Luther Price. Next we will make our way to Espacio Gallery for a group exhibition titled Organism, featuring the work of Penelope Kupfer among an illustrious list of artists. Last stop is Paulo Nimer‘s solo show at Maureen Paley. See below for the schedule and map of the route with links to exhibition details. Free, no need to book.

SCHEDULE MAP
14:00
Cambridge Heath Station Hackney, London E2 9EG
14:15 Oliver Stone & Luther Price Vilma Gold 6 Minerva St, London E2 9EH
15:15 Organism Espacio Gallery 159 Bethnal Green Road London E2 7DG
16:15 Paulo Nimer Maureen Paley 21 Herald Street London E2 6JT

#3 Hyde Park to Shadwell

Saturday 14 May 2016, 14:00-18:00
Curated by Penelope Kupfer
Free, booking not required

[GALLERYTOUR] #3 webflyer

On Saturday, 14 May 2016 we will meet at the Serpentine Gallery at 2pm to view Hilma af Klimt: Painting the Unseen and then make our way to the Sackler Gallery to view of the exhibition by DAS INSTITUT. Then we will head to the Rum Factory near Shadwell DLR station to see the work of Richard Burger. See below for the schedule and map of the route with links to exhibition details. Free, no need to book, just join us at 2pm. Latecomers can join us along the way.

SCHEDULE MAP
14:00
Serpentine Gallery Kensington Gardens, London W2 3XA
14:15 Hilma af Klint Serpentine Gallery, Kensington Gardens, London W2 3XA
15:00 DAS INSTITUT Serpentine Sackler Gallery, W Carriage Dr, London W2 2AR
16:00 Lancaster Gate Tube Station Central Line to Bank, then DLR to Shadwell
17:00 Open Studios 2016 Rum Factory, Bow Arts, Unit 4, Pennington Street, E1W 2BD

#2 Whitechapel to Liverpool Street

Saturday 30 April 2016, 14:00-17:00
Free, booking not required

[GALLERYTOUR] #2 web-flier

On Saturday, 30 April 2016 we will meet at the bookshop inside the Whitechapel Gallery at 2pm to view Harun Farocki‘s video installation Parallel I-IV and  the archival exhibition Imprint 93 with prints by young British artists of the 1990s. Then we will head to Raven Row near Liverpool Street to see the work of Channa Horwitz. Please see below for the schedule and a map of the route. Free event, no need to book. Latecomers can join us along the way.

SCHEDULE MAP
14:00
Whitechapel Gallery 77-82 Whitechapel High St. London E1 7QX
14:15 Harun Farocki Parallel I-IV Whitechapel Gallery
15:00 Imprint 93 Whitechapel Gallery
16:00 Channa Horwitz Raven Row 56 Artillery Lane London E1 7LS

#1 Hoxton to Mile End

Saturday 19 March 2016, 14:00-17:00
Free, booking not required

[GALLERYTOUR] #1 web-flier

On Saturday, 19 March 2016 we will meet at Hoxton Rail Station at 2pm. From there we will walk to xero, kline & coma to see Under the Shade I Flourish by Chris Alton. Heading east we will stop at Cell Project Space to see Ian Ball ‘s Praseodymium Intracrine Signal Aggregate and and we will end the tour with Park McArthur‘s Poly at Chisenhale Gallery. Please see below for the schedule and a map of the route. Free event, no need to book, just join us at 2pm. Latecomers can join us along the way.

SCHEDULE MAP
14:00
Hoxton Rail Station Geffrye Street, London E2 8EA
14:15 Chris Alton: Under the Shade I Flourish xero, kline & coma, 258 Hackney Road, London E2 7SJ
15:15 Iain Ball  Cell Project Space, 258 Cambridge Heath Road, London E2 9DA
16:15 Park McArthur: Poly Chisenhale Gallery, 64 Chisenhale Road, London E3 5QZ